About Us

Kalayaan is a small London based charity which works to provide practical advice and support to, as well as campaign with and for, the rights of migrant domestic workers in the UK.

Our History

Kalayaan is a registered charity in England and Wales (no. 1146596) and a registered company in England and Wales (no. 7968872). Kalayaan was formally established in 1987 by domestic workers and their supporters. At that time migrant domestic workers in the UK were not recognised within the immigration rules and were brought into the UK informally by their employers.

The only proof of the way they entered was usually a stamp in their passport which read ‘visa to work with..’ and which named the employer. There would be no issue with immigration while the worker remained with their employer but if they left (usually due to unpaid wages or poor treatment) there was no formal recognition of how they entered or their status in the UK leaving them in a vulnerable and precarious position.

Read more…

Staff

  • Rita Gava
    Director
  • Josie Collins
    Casework Officer
  • Avril Sharp
    Policy and Casework Officer
  • Marta Bratek
    Immigration Solicitor

Trustees

  • Francesca Cooney
    Chair
  • Rob Fink
    Co-Chair and Confidentiality Officer
  • David Ould
    Treasurer
  • Dr Virginia Mantouvalou

What We Do

Kalayaan is a registered charity in England and Wales (no. 1146596) and a registered company in England and Wales (no. 7968872). Kalayaan was formally established in 1987 by domestic workers and their supporters. At that time migrant domestic workers in the UK were not recognised within the immigration rules and were brought into the UK informally by their employers.

The only proof of the way they entered was usually a stamp in their passport which read ‘visa to work with..’ and which named the employer. There would be no issue with immigration while the worker remained with their employer but if they left (usually due to unpaid wages or poor treatment) there was no formal recognition of how they entered or their status in the UK leaving them in a vulnerable and precarious position.

Read more…